Welcome to the Marble Center for Cancer Nanomedicine

Meet the first class of Convergence Scholars

Meet the First Class of Convergence Scholars

The Convergence Scholars Program provides postdoctoral trainees at the Marble Center with opportunities to further their experiences and skills beyond the research laboratory space. Click here to learn more.

Celebrating National Nanotechnology Day

Celebrating National Nanotechnology Day

Dr. Sangeeta Bhatia's commentary for National Nanotechnology Day featured by the National Academy of Sciences. Click here to read the commentary.

Dr. Bob Langer

Dr. Bob Langer receives the 2017 Kabiller Prize in Nanoscience and Nanomedicine from Northwestern

Dr. Robert S. Langer, David H. Koch Institute Professor at MIT and member of the Marble Center for Cancer Nanomedicine, is the recipient of the $250,000 Kabiller Prize in Nanoscience and Nanomedicine from Northwestern. The prize recognizes the people designing the technologies that will drive innovation in nanomedicine and also to educate others as to the field’s great promise for helping society. Click here for the press release.

Converging on cancer at the nanoscale

Converging on cancer at the nanoscale

Marking its first anniversary, the Koch Institute’s Marble Center for Cancer Nanomedicine goes full steam ahead. See the article in MIT News here.

Koch Institute Summer Symposium: Convergence of Science and Engineering in Cancer

MIT’s Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research held on June 16th its Annual Cancer Research Symposium: Convergence of Science and Engineering in Cancer. Convergence—the merging of historically distinct disciplines such as engineering, physics, computer science, chemistry, mathematics, and the life sciences—has created extraordinary opportunities in cancer research and care. Leaders in this emerging field discussed innovative new approaches and technologies to better detect, monitor, treat, and prevent cancer. See the article from the Boston Globe here and the KI press release here.

Nanoscale dream team: 3 MIT professors use tiniest of tools against cancer

Drs. Belcher, Bhatia, and Hammond are innovating at the tiniest scale—developing tools to see, target and kill cancer cells before they can cause any harm. See article here.

A high-magnification micrograph of an ovarian clear cell carcinoma

New technology can detect tiny ovarian tumors

Synthetic biomarkers could be used to diagnose ovarian cancer months earlier than now possible. See article here. Photo credit: Nephron/CC BY-SA 3.0.

Tiny Trojan Horses

Tiny Trojan Horses: Tumor-penetrating nanoparticles infiltrate cancer cells

Winner of the 2017 Koch Institute Public Galleries (click here to see other winners). This image shows biocompatible nanoparticles (yellow) inside clusters of pancreatic cancer cells (pink). The particles’ two-peptide uptake system—one to target the tumor, the second to penetrate it—was specially designed to overcome known difficulties in treating pancreatic cancer. Funded in part by the Marble Center for Cancer Nanomedicine at MIT's Koch Institute. Photo credit: Liangliang Hao, Srivatsan Raghavan, Emilia Pulver, Jeffrey Wyckoff, Sangeeta Bhatia.

Tethered nanoparticles make tumor cells more vulnerable

Tethered nanoparticles make tumor cells more vulnerable

New strategy could improve performance of some immune-based drugs. See article herePhoto credit: Second Bay Studios.

Robert Langer, The Delivery Man

Robert Langer, The Delivery Man

The downfall of many drugs is that they are not taken regularly or as prescribed. Robert Langer has developed a polymer that could solve this problem. See article herePhoto credit: Nick D Burton; original article by Kathryn Nave from WIRED Magazine.

Image gallery for National Nanotechnology Day

Image gallery for National Nanotechnology Day

In honor of the first annual National Nanotechnology Day, the Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research at MIT presents an interactive peek into how researchers across the MIT campus are using nanomaterials to explore and improve the world. Source: The Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research at MIT.

The Marble Center for Cancer Nanomedicine aims to galvanize the MIT research community in efforts to have an indelible impact on cancer diagnosis and care.